Friday, November 18, 2011

Gunpowder

What does gunpowder remind you of? Dumb question, right? Obviously, it reminds you of guns, explosives and what not. Some might recollect that Gunpowder was the horse that Ichabod Crane, the lanky hero from the Legend of Sleepy Hollow, rode when he went to meet his lady love Katrina Van Tassel. (That's another book I'll never tire of reading!)

However, for me, the mere mention of the word 'gunpowder' brings to mind Amma's crispy white dosas and the humble molagapodi. Molagapodi, for the uninitiated, is a spicy powdery mixture of... (err, I really don't know what, any help here?) that tastes absolutely divine with dosa and its steamed version, the idli. You add a dash of oil, mix it with the fiery molagapodi and your taste buds are in for a treat. Come to think of it, gunpowder indeed is a truly apt nickname!

I remember a few months ago, a friend and I went to a restaurant known as Murugan's Idli Kadai (a local favorite, you can ask anyone here) and we just pigged out on dosas, (ok am tired of italicizing this already!) idlies and molagapodi. An uncle was sitting on the other side of the table and he was looking at the molagapodi with a lot of interest. He didn't know what it was and I tried my best to explain it to him- 'It should be eaten with idlies and dosas, with a tinge of oil, and it'll taste really really good!' 'What's it called?’ he asked. 'Gunpowder', I promptly said. You should have seen the look on his face! :D I quickly reaffirmed that it was indeed edible, but I don't think he liked it much. Oh well, if you decide not to like something, nothing can be done about it right?

I remember the countless times Amma would pack this delightful combination in a little dabba for my recess breaks at school. And being the rather stubborn idiot that I am was, I would take it back home, because I was too busy at school. Hmph. Anything to get it back now, neatly packed in a plastic box; a reminder of Amma's love and sacrifice. (That's what she would say each day I took it back without eating- Here I am,waking up at 4 each morning and making things for you- and you say you're too busy to eat! Will a donkey be able to realize the fragrance of camphor?! I agree, the last phrase doesn't sound right- I tried my best to translate :D



Well, what's the point of this rather pointless post? I'm just craving for some dosa and my favorite molagapodi and it looks like I'll have to wait a long time to get it, thanks to my nightmares exams. Fair enough, don't you think?

3 comments:

  1. Gun podwer doesn't remind me of guns. It reminds me of that exquisite powder that was our saviour during hostel days. If not for that powder that my roomie used to get bottles and bottles of from home, none of us could have swallowed the mess(y) food. She still gets a bottle whenever she returns from a trip home. It's what makes our rice-and-curd dinner bearable. :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Oh yes, the gunpowder. I heard this term for the first time at Lawrence, Lovedale, Ooty where the boys talked about gunpowder at meal times. This gunpowder is not to be confused with its distinguished cousin ‘Chammanthi podi’ also known popularly as ‘kerala mud’. Whilst the gunpowder was very popular with the students from Tamil Nad, those that devoured the kerala mud were from God’s own country. The Andhraties had their own version of ‘pappu podi’ which had dal and red chilies in equal measure. A couple of spoons of this podi with ghee and rice will ensure that you reach heights of culinary delight as also hit the roof!! Certainly not for the weak hearted!!!! All these powders can be consumed with rice, dosa and idlis and even with bread and instant noodles as demonstrated by the indomitable, ‘Never give in’ spirit of the Lawrencians.
    Though the ingredients are different in different podis, It’s purpose is the same- that of enhancing the flavor of drab food. In my early days of experimenting with cooking, this was a saving grace (my mother used to prepare and send it). Even now after a hard day’s work I settle for a dosa sprinkled with this molagapodi. Since I have not yet mastered the art of making it perfectly, I solely depend on the readymade chutney powder (as they are called in this new era) available in the market.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love, love, love molagapodi! All I want to eat when I'm at my mom's is dosa and molagapodi.

    I like to take a heaped scoop the powder, place it right in the middle of the dosa, make a little well, pour in generous amounts of oil, and devour it. The piece that remains in the middle is the tastiest ever!

    I don't know what molagapodi is made of either. Shameful, I say!

    ReplyDelete

Friday, November 18, 2011

Gunpowder

What does gunpowder remind you of? Dumb question, right? Obviously, it reminds you of guns, explosives and what not. Some might recollect that Gunpowder was the horse that Ichabod Crane, the lanky hero from the Legend of Sleepy Hollow, rode when he went to meet his lady love Katrina Van Tassel. (That's another book I'll never tire of reading!)

However, for me, the mere mention of the word 'gunpowder' brings to mind Amma's crispy white dosas and the humble molagapodi. Molagapodi, for the uninitiated, is a spicy powdery mixture of... (err, I really don't know what, any help here?) that tastes absolutely divine with dosa and its steamed version, the idli. You add a dash of oil, mix it with the fiery molagapodi and your taste buds are in for a treat. Come to think of it, gunpowder indeed is a truly apt nickname!

I remember a few months ago, a friend and I went to a restaurant known as Murugan's Idli Kadai (a local favorite, you can ask anyone here) and we just pigged out on dosas, (ok am tired of italicizing this already!) idlies and molagapodi. An uncle was sitting on the other side of the table and he was looking at the molagapodi with a lot of interest. He didn't know what it was and I tried my best to explain it to him- 'It should be eaten with idlies and dosas, with a tinge of oil, and it'll taste really really good!' 'What's it called?’ he asked. 'Gunpowder', I promptly said. You should have seen the look on his face! :D I quickly reaffirmed that it was indeed edible, but I don't think he liked it much. Oh well, if you decide not to like something, nothing can be done about it right?

I remember the countless times Amma would pack this delightful combination in a little dabba for my recess breaks at school. And being the rather stubborn idiot that I am was, I would take it back home, because I was too busy at school. Hmph. Anything to get it back now, neatly packed in a plastic box; a reminder of Amma's love and sacrifice. (That's what she would say each day I took it back without eating- Here I am,waking up at 4 each morning and making things for you- and you say you're too busy to eat! Will a donkey be able to realize the fragrance of camphor?! I agree, the last phrase doesn't sound right- I tried my best to translate :D



Well, what's the point of this rather pointless post? I'm just craving for some dosa and my favorite molagapodi and it looks like I'll have to wait a long time to get it, thanks to my nightmares exams. Fair enough, don't you think?

3 comments:

  1. Gun podwer doesn't remind me of guns. It reminds me of that exquisite powder that was our saviour during hostel days. If not for that powder that my roomie used to get bottles and bottles of from home, none of us could have swallowed the mess(y) food. She still gets a bottle whenever she returns from a trip home. It's what makes our rice-and-curd dinner bearable. :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Oh yes, the gunpowder. I heard this term for the first time at Lawrence, Lovedale, Ooty where the boys talked about gunpowder at meal times. This gunpowder is not to be confused with its distinguished cousin ‘Chammanthi podi’ also known popularly as ‘kerala mud’. Whilst the gunpowder was very popular with the students from Tamil Nad, those that devoured the kerala mud were from God’s own country. The Andhraties had their own version of ‘pappu podi’ which had dal and red chilies in equal measure. A couple of spoons of this podi with ghee and rice will ensure that you reach heights of culinary delight as also hit the roof!! Certainly not for the weak hearted!!!! All these powders can be consumed with rice, dosa and idlis and even with bread and instant noodles as demonstrated by the indomitable, ‘Never give in’ spirit of the Lawrencians.
    Though the ingredients are different in different podis, It’s purpose is the same- that of enhancing the flavor of drab food. In my early days of experimenting with cooking, this was a saving grace (my mother used to prepare and send it). Even now after a hard day’s work I settle for a dosa sprinkled with this molagapodi. Since I have not yet mastered the art of making it perfectly, I solely depend on the readymade chutney powder (as they are called in this new era) available in the market.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love, love, love molagapodi! All I want to eat when I'm at my mom's is dosa and molagapodi.

    I like to take a heaped scoop the powder, place it right in the middle of the dosa, make a little well, pour in generous amounts of oil, and devour it. The piece that remains in the middle is the tastiest ever!

    I don't know what molagapodi is made of either. Shameful, I say!

    ReplyDelete