Saturday, December 10, 2011

The Paradox of Our Age

I'm reading William Dalrymple's The Age of Kali: Indian Travels and Encounters currently. The title of the book is with reference to the Kali Yuga, which according to ancient scriptures is the darkest of all the ages. As I read the book, I discover interesting aspects about the great nation that India is (but that would be another post altogether)- For instance, I discovered that the four ages or yugas- Satya, Treta, Dvapara and Kali were named after the four sides of a traditional die. Dalrymple writes 'Each successive age represents a period of increasing moral and social deterioration'. If we were to believe the scriptures, we are currently in the Kali Yuga, rife with strife, corruption, chaos. As I look at the happenings around the world, this certainly doesn't appear false.

A few days ago, I came across The Paradox of Our Age by His Holiness the fourteenth Dalai Lama. It seems to epitomize the current Kali age we live in:

"We have bigger houses but smaller families;
more conveniences, but less time;
We have more degrees, but less sense;
more knowledge, but less judgment;
more experts, but more problems;
more medicines, but less health;
We've been all the way to the moon and back,
but have trouble crossing the street to meet
the new neighbor.
We've built more computers to hold more
information to produce more copies than ever,
but have less communications;
We have become long on quantity,
but short on quality.
These times are times of fast foods;
but slow digestion;
Tall men but short character;
Steep profits but shallow relationships.
It is a time when there is much in the window,
but nothing in the room."

Profound. Enough said.

P.S: I thought the holidays would allow me to blog away to my hearts' content. Sadly, I seem to have run out of anything witty/funny/sensible to write about. Hmph. OK, being the 'quotehanger' that I am, I shall end this one with another quote, this time from the legendary Mark Twain- 'Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most'.

6 comments:

  1. truly. those lies just say it all.. makes so much sense really :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. I remember having read those lines somewhere, but didn't know who'd said it. Now I know it's the Dalai Lama. Thanks for putting it up here. Indeed very profound.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hahaha paradox indeed.., its just that the things we invented to make our life simpler have consumed most of our time...!! Nicely written.. Happy holidays.. Don't worry... Am sure you ll come up wit something innovative and new again.. :):)

    cheers...!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Mark Twain's quotes are sheer genius. One of my favourites of his is this- "But who prays for Satan? In the last 16 centuries who had the common humanity to pray for the one person who needed it the most?" It's not exactly the same line, but close.
    It is indeed Kalikaalam. So many deaths, so much of evil. Maybe it is better that the world ends in 2012 after all...

    ReplyDelete
  5. Those lines are really profound.
    I read somewhere that the worst of Kaliyug is yet to come. So maybe we're lucky that its still not that bad. I feel there's some amount of humanity left in this world, even if it's a little.

    ReplyDelete
  6. @CS, amazing how much is conveyed through those simple lines, really!
    @Vinitha, thank you for dropping by :)
    @Nick, thanks a lot! Hopefully, I'll get out of this phase soon..
    @Spiff, wow that quote sure is profound!
    @Sumitra,you're right- I do agree that there's still hope for us, although all seems to be lost!

    ReplyDelete

Saturday, December 10, 2011

The Paradox of Our Age

I'm reading William Dalrymple's The Age of Kali: Indian Travels and Encounters currently. The title of the book is with reference to the Kali Yuga, which according to ancient scriptures is the darkest of all the ages. As I read the book, I discover interesting aspects about the great nation that India is (but that would be another post altogether)- For instance, I discovered that the four ages or yugas- Satya, Treta, Dvapara and Kali were named after the four sides of a traditional die. Dalrymple writes 'Each successive age represents a period of increasing moral and social deterioration'. If we were to believe the scriptures, we are currently in the Kali Yuga, rife with strife, corruption, chaos. As I look at the happenings around the world, this certainly doesn't appear false.

A few days ago, I came across The Paradox of Our Age by His Holiness the fourteenth Dalai Lama. It seems to epitomize the current Kali age we live in:

"We have bigger houses but smaller families;
more conveniences, but less time;
We have more degrees, but less sense;
more knowledge, but less judgment;
more experts, but more problems;
more medicines, but less health;
We've been all the way to the moon and back,
but have trouble crossing the street to meet
the new neighbor.
We've built more computers to hold more
information to produce more copies than ever,
but have less communications;
We have become long on quantity,
but short on quality.
These times are times of fast foods;
but slow digestion;
Tall men but short character;
Steep profits but shallow relationships.
It is a time when there is much in the window,
but nothing in the room."

Profound. Enough said.

P.S: I thought the holidays would allow me to blog away to my hearts' content. Sadly, I seem to have run out of anything witty/funny/sensible to write about. Hmph. OK, being the 'quotehanger' that I am, I shall end this one with another quote, this time from the legendary Mark Twain- 'Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most'.

6 comments:

  1. truly. those lies just say it all.. makes so much sense really :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. I remember having read those lines somewhere, but didn't know who'd said it. Now I know it's the Dalai Lama. Thanks for putting it up here. Indeed very profound.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hahaha paradox indeed.., its just that the things we invented to make our life simpler have consumed most of our time...!! Nicely written.. Happy holidays.. Don't worry... Am sure you ll come up wit something innovative and new again.. :):)

    cheers...!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Mark Twain's quotes are sheer genius. One of my favourites of his is this- "But who prays for Satan? In the last 16 centuries who had the common humanity to pray for the one person who needed it the most?" It's not exactly the same line, but close.
    It is indeed Kalikaalam. So many deaths, so much of evil. Maybe it is better that the world ends in 2012 after all...

    ReplyDelete
  5. Those lines are really profound.
    I read somewhere that the worst of Kaliyug is yet to come. So maybe we're lucky that its still not that bad. I feel there's some amount of humanity left in this world, even if it's a little.

    ReplyDelete
  6. @CS, amazing how much is conveyed through those simple lines, really!
    @Vinitha, thank you for dropping by :)
    @Nick, thanks a lot! Hopefully, I'll get out of this phase soon..
    @Spiff, wow that quote sure is profound!
    @Sumitra,you're right- I do agree that there's still hope for us, although all seems to be lost!

    ReplyDelete